Category Archives: Exegesis

Primarily, Jesus didn’t die for you…

Primarily, Jesus didn’t die for you…

In the core of our fallen and sinful nature, we subconsciously elevate ourselves to be more than we really are. Even us Christians, and professing christians equally, we lift ourselves up to think that our cosmic creator molds His eternal will to fit our prayers and needs.

On the contrary, our existence rest upon the foremost purpose of bringing glory to Him, our foremost service is to bring glory to Him, our will and desire must compliment and subscribe to the holy, inerrant and infallible will of God the Father. Anything else – is sin.

Jesus died on the cross, willingly laying down his life, because it was the will of the Father. Saying, Father, if thou be willing, remove this cup from me: nevertheless not my will, but thine, be done.” Luke 22:42

Are we the benefactors of His death, indisputably! Was His love for us a motivating factor for His sacrifice, unequivocally! Was our salvation through His death on the cross one of the reasons God sent Him to the cross, absolutely! (Although still, it was not God’s primary reason for sending His Son to die on the cross either.)

My biblical exegesis is not to take away from these things, nor to diminish the work of Christ at Golgotha, rather to exalt all the more His work on Calvary. His purpose, the reason for Jesus’ incarnate birth, the very act of God’s condescension was to demonstrate His holiness and to fulfill His sole will, unto the death of His only Son.

“And being found in appearance as a man, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to death— even death on a cross!” Philippians 2:8

On the surface, and to the casual reader, the words herein blasphemes the average church goer’s religion. Some, maybe such as you, will take offense to all that I’ve written here. Still others, are already offended that a sinner such as I would even be posting on Christian topics. Nevertheless, I am confident that still others, those who feed on the meat of scripture, will as with second nature, be in agreement.

Liken to the writer of Hebrews, (which parenthetically, I believe is Apollos), deliberately he does not minimize the scripture, the angels, nor the prophets in his effort to exalt the Christ. He emboldens the significance of each, hitherto claims the Christ is above them all. There is no need to deduct from the former to realize the preeminence of the latter. Hence, I have undertaken the task to do likewise… obedience is greater than sacrifice.

Albeit, Christ did, in effect, die for our sins on the cross. He did, in effect, do so because of His love for us. However, His key motivation and primary resolve for going to the cross was His obedience to the Father. This obedience to God the Father, is a far greater thing than dying for me, a wretched sinner.

“For those whom He foreknew, He also predestined to become conformed to the image of His [obedient] Son, so that He would be the firstborn among many brethren” – Romans 8:29 (parentheses added for emphasis)

Despite all our sin, our rebellious habits, futile intentions, immature behaviors, and disheartened religious acts; He loves us and only wants our hearts. He must be our first love, He left no other option.

Matthew 4:1-11 – Exegesis of Jesus’ Temptations

Overview
Christ was repeatedly tempted during his ministry (Luke 4:13, 22:28; Mark 8:11), and these temptations in Matthew 4 and parallels. His temptations are for demonstration of His purity and sinlessness (Hebrew 4:15) without possibility of enticement to evil (James 1:13.)

Generally there are two schools of thought among theologians concerning Jesus’ temptations:

Peccability: Liability to sin. (Christ could have sinned)
Typically an Armenian view

Impeccability: The absence of sin. (Christ could not have sinned)
Typically a Calvinistic view

Temptations
The first was for Jesus to distrust the provisional care of His Father and to use His own divine powers to serve Himself. The second was to presume on the Father’s care by putting Him to the test. The third was for Him to renounce the way of His Father and to substitute the way of Satan.

V3 – should you starve in the wilderness if you are really God’s Son? 1st temptation need already existed

V6 – prove to yourself and the world that you really are the Son of God. 2nd temptation need to be created
If you won’t use your own divine power to help yourself, let you Father use His divine power

V9 – why should you have to wait for what is already rightfully yours? Why submit like a servant when you can be king?

Comparisons

Contrast
The first Adam – The second Adam (Jesus)
Plunged us into sin – Paved way for us out of sin
Plush garden w/food – Desert without food
Genesis temptation was to eat – Temptation began with eating
Temptation to be like God by disobeying God – Temptation to be king without obeying God
Adam & Eve weren’t real sure what God said – Jesus knew because he knew scripture
After sinning angels guarded the gate to the garden – After victory angels came to minister to him

Similarity
Look at the fruit – lust of the eye Kingdoms of the earth
Fruit – lust of the flesh Turn these stones to bread
Be like God – pride of life Throw yourself off

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