Matthew 4:1-11 – Exegesis of Jesus’ Temptations

Overview
Christ was repeatedly tempted during his ministry (Luke 4:13, 22:28; Mark 8:11), and these temptations in Matthew 4 and parallels. His temptations are for demonstration of His purity and sinlessness (Hebrew 4:15) without possibility of enticement to evil (James 1:13.)

Generally there are two schools of thought among theologians concerning Jesus’ temptations:

Peccability: Liability to sin. (Christ could have sinned)
Typically an Armenian view

Impeccability: The absence of sin. (Christ could not have sinned)
Typically a Calvinistic view

Temptations
The first was for Jesus to distrust the provisional care of His Father and to use His own divine powers to serve Himself. The second was to presume on the Father’s care by putting Him to the test. The third was for Him to renounce the way of His Father and to substitute the way of Satan.

V3 – should you starve in the wilderness if you are really God’s Son? 1st temptation need already existed

V6 – prove to yourself and the world that you really are the Son of God. 2nd temptation need to be created
If you won’t use your own divine power to help yourself, let you Father use His divine power

V9 – why should you have to wait for what is already rightfully yours? Why submit like a servant when you can be king?

Comparisons

Contrast
The first Adam – The second Adam (Jesus)
Plunged us into sin – Paved way for us out of sin
Plush garden w/food – Desert without food
Genesis temptation was to eat – Temptation began with eating
Temptation to be like God by disobeying God – Temptation to be king without obeying God
Adam & Eve weren’t real sure what God said – Jesus knew because he knew scripture
After sinning angels guarded the gate to the garden – After victory angels came to minister to him

Similarity
Look at the fruit – lust of the eye Kingdoms of the earth
Fruit – lust of the flesh Turn these stones to bread
Be like God – pride of life Throw yourself off

Posted on July 25, in Bible, Bible Study, Exegesis. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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